Response to Dazzle, 2019

The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle
The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle

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The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle
The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle

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The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle
The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle

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The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle
The Noematic Collective - Response to Dazzle

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Photos by Andrew Cope

Response to Dazzle

 

MPC, Projector, Glass Tank, AMP, Contact Microphones, Matches, Water, Soft Drum Mallets, Trumpet, Trumpet Mute. 

Approx 9 mins' (Performance)

2019

Video by Mark Adcock

"From the 18th of February until the 25th of April 2019, TheGallery at Arts University Bournemouth ran the Dazzle & The Art of Defence Exhibition. The exhibition contextualised the artist Norman Wilkinson’s First World War ‘Dazzle’ schemes of disruptive camouflage against the wider contribution of the arts and creative industries to the defence of Britain in wartime. 

 

In the exhibition, The Noematic Collective consisting of AUB Fine Art students, in collaboration with Richard Waring, performed a new and live experimental art work ‘Response to Dazzle’. Through the manipulation and disorientation of sound and vision the art work disrupts and confuses the viewers sensory perceptions.

 

During the performance, ‘Response to Dazzle’, the Crab drawing Studio becomes a stage for a new performative spectacle that combines projection with the human analogue voice and disembodied and synthesised digitised voice. 

 

The dark quietness of the space is penetrated by disruptive sound and light waves, some of which may seem familiar and recognisable. These waves ricochet off the curvilinear smooth wales, returning to hit our alert senses, disrupting our perceptions and bringing our senses to life.

 

The work explores the discord of sensations we experience in our daily lived experience, a miss- mash of sounds, vision and space, all of these wrapped up in our personal memories and the immediacy of the here and now.

 

These components of experience are separated out and re-sensed in a space that allows for focussed consideration. Our perception of time and space is distorted, being both stretched and compacted by the sonic and visual palette.

To scan is to search, to pass over a surface, to analyse. The scan glides back and forth, hypnotically and rhythmically connecting into and out of the rhythms of the sound being made.

 

The scan collapses volume into a shallow planar surface, with the viewers eyes looking both onto and into the shallow space of the water tank where many actions are performed and sounds are created." - TheGallery AUB